Making Innovation Possible

Daedalus Yachts is using composite construction to build the first high-speed, zero emissions sailing yacht.

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Zero Emissions Yacht Built from Composites

Incredibly fast sailing yachts are being built with composites, and they’re setting new records in ocean-going speed. Daedalus Yachts is taking this concept of fast cruising a step further by adding green technology to power the systems on its Daedalus 80. This new technology eliminates the need to stop for fuel, extending the cruising range of the Daedalus 80 indefinitely.

Symmetrix was called in to shape and fabricate a modular tooling solution for ‘Phase One’ of the construction process; building canoe bodies and the structural wet deck surfaces. The 23 female molds not only fit together seamlessly but stand up to the post-curing process required for pre-preg carbon construction. The hulls are female-molded, vacuum-cured carbon and epoxy foam sandwich construction. The infused carbon-fiber molds match the thermal expansion properties of these materials, ensuring accurate final shapes for the hulls.

The Daedalus 80 is currently under construction in North Carolina. Read more on their website.

 

Newest Back Cove is Designed for Outboards

The first Back Cove with outboard engines features an entirely new hull that was designed using the power of computational fluid dynamics. From this sophisticated design, Symmetrix shaped a single-piece FRP production mold that will accommodate Back Cove’s infusion construction process and deliver the highest level of finish over the many expected pulls.

The hull, fitted with a standard bow thruster and designed specifically for outboard propulsion, offers cruise and top-end speeds approximately 10 knots faster than the traditional, single diesel engine Back Cove. Sea trials will take place in August, and the Back Cover 34O will debut at the 2018 Newport International Boat Show. Read more on the Back Cove Yachts website. 

 

Composite Autonomous Aircraft

Valkyrie Systems Aerospace came to us to shape a prototype of their latest unmanned aerial vehicle. The “Eagle” is amphibious, hovers like a helicopter, and flies with the power of a fighter jet.

Utilizing our 360-degree tooling capabilities, we created a precise one-quarter scale model of the Eagle. Our 5-axis machine, combined with the experience of our engineering and build teams, allowed us to create geometry that would otherwise be impossible to remove from a mold. In addition, the machined piece is more accurate than a hand-built model and was shaped in a matter of hours.

Cut from a single block of foam (with the exception of the winglets), the one-quarter scale model has a wingspan of 7.7 feet, measures 5.2 feet from nose to tail, and has a body height of 1.6 feet. The winglets were cut separately and shaped with keyways for attachment to the wings.

To learn more about this  UAV, visit the Valkyrie Systems Aerospace website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reshaping the Past: Enterprise Keel

For nearly 30 years, 12-Meter yachts took center stage at the America’s Cup. The last 12-Meter was built in the late ’80s, but a meticulously restored fleet of “Twelves” continues to race in Newport, RI, thanks to a group of enthusiastic owners.

Enterprise (US 27), built in 1977, is the latest 12-Meter to undergo restoration. This includes adding a newly redesigned, fully optimized keel. Sparkman and Stephens was engaged to do a performance analysis and design the new keel; Symmetrix was brought in to create an accurate pattern.

The Symmetrix pattern will be used by the Broomfield foundry to create a cast concrete mold. Lead is poured into this mold to create the keel.

Twelve Meters race under a complex rating rule that takes many factors into consideration, including weight and volume of underwater surfaces. Precise shaping of the mold is critical; if it’s off by even a fraction of an inch, too much (or too little) lead will be used, throwing off the keel weight. Symmetrix’s precise CNC shaping of the pattern ensures that the molds are accurate, which in turn ensures that the keel meets the size and weight calculated by Sparkman and Stephens.

The refit of Enterprise will be completed this spring, in time for the 2018 racing season.

 

 

Shaping the Future with Zaha Hadid

“An unprecedented fusion of art, architecture, design, location, and luxury,” is how Zaha Hadid Architects describe its 62-story residential tower, One Thousand Museum, currently under construction in Miami. Symmetrix’s Composite Innovation Center in Nevada is creating the molds that Kreysler & Associates will use to construct FRP panels featured on the top floor of this fascinating architectural project.

The panels will become a wall that arches up and over the pool and event spaces located in the Aquatic Center at the top of the building. Not only does this wall curve from floor to ceiling; it has a water drop pattern that continues around all four sides of the building.

The direct-to-mold tooling is comprised of 65 unique parts. The tooling is optimized to deliver the high aesthetic requirements for the project as well as to meet their production schedule.

The curved wall is just one incredible detail in this ground-breaking project. Its overall construction is so challenging that the building is featured on the PBS series “Impossible Builds.” Construction of One Thousand Museum is scheduled for completion later this year.